CHHA Thanks Farmers as Hail Season Ends

Members of the Canadian Crop Hail Association are proud to have helped farmers in western Canada manage the risks of Mother Nature as hail season ends, the association’s president said.

“Our members companies are honored to support farmers across Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan with crop insurance that helps them manage risk and remain in a strong financial position for another growing season,” said Rick Omelchenko, CCHA president. “We want to thank all of our customers across the provinces for their business and patience during yet another season of unusual weather in western Canada.”

CCHA members are finalizing the last of the region’s hail damage claims and analyzing data about storm activity and crop damage for a year-end report that will be released soon.

September is shaping up to be the most damaging month with a series of late season hailstorms and flooding rain that hit crops right at harvest time.

“Overall, farmers are telling our member companies that the 2019 harvest was a challenge with damaging storms, cool wet weather and snow storms, and not all were able to complete harvest,” Omelchenko said. “We congratulate growers who were able to get their crops in the bin, and hope the remaining crop left out also gets in.  The Canadian Crop Hail Association always hopes everyone has a great harvest and looks forward to serving them again next season.”

It’s never too early to start planning insurance coverage for next season, Omelchenko said

“Please contact our local CCHA member company and let us help you find the insurance products you need to protect your investment and manage weather risks,” he said.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Hail Damage Decreases Across Western Canada

Farmers reported a decrease in hail damage across western Canada with colder weather that has meant less storm activity, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 28-30 and Oct. 14 and 19.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 53 claims of crop damage in Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, says storms damaged soybean, wheat and canola in Manitoba.

More than 80 percent of claims for Manitoba are complete, he said.

In Saskatchewan, pea-size hail damaged canola, wheat, barley, flax, soybeans, Bantle said.

Excessive moisture and the natural breakdown of crops are among factors in adjusting, Bantle said.

Claims adjustments in Saskatchewan are nearly complete, he said.

“Damage from the September storm is well above the 5-year average,” Bantle said.

Storms in September were costly due to the amount of unharvested ripe crop still in the fields, Bantle said.

Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail also reported hail damage in Saskatchewan with rain and snow among factors in adjusting.

“We are currently finishing adjusting claims from late September in the South Central and South East parts of Saskatchewan,” he said. “This has been challenging due to the high moisture levels in some areas as well as the unwelcome snowfalls.”

All claims are nearing completion for Rain and Hail Insurance, said Tyson Ryhorchuk.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Wet Fields Continue to Slow Hail Damage Investigations Across Western Canada

Heavy rain and wet fields continue to slow crop damage investigations as farmers report a new round of hailstorms across western Canada, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 17-30.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 640 claims of crop damage in Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the time period.

Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service said a Sept. 24 storm in Manitoba resulted claims of damage to canola, soybeans, wheat and oats. Damage ranged from light to medium. Rainfall is a factor as adjusters investigate.

“We ask that all producers remain patient as the ground saturation from recent heavy rainfall has greatly delayed the speed in which our adjusters can investigate claims,” he said.

Murray Bantle of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company also said rain is a factor in investigating a series of storms in Manitoba on Sept. 20, 21 and 24 that damaged cereals, oilseeds, pulses, corn and other specialty crops.

“These storms were extremely wet with lots of rain recently,” he said. “Producers should be patient and ensure adequate samples are left.”

An appropriate check strip for crop damage is at least 20 by 30 feet in the four corners and in the middle of the field.

August storm claims filed with Cooperative Hail are complete, Bantle said. The number of claims is within the 5-year average. The average payable claim was slight below the 5-year average in August, he said.

September claims are 62 percent complete. Damage from the September storms is above the 5-year average so far, he said. Storms Sept. 17-20 were costly due to the amount of unharvested ripe crop still in the fields and severity of the storms, Bantle said.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Heavy Rain From Late Season Storms Slows Crop Damage Investigations

Farmers in western Canada reported scattered but damaging storms that dropped golf-ball sized hail in some cases along with heavy rain that is slowing investigations, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 20-25. New reports from damaging storms on Sept. 17 and 18 continue to come in.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 700 claims of hail damage to all crops in in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, said the late fall storm system was wide and mainly tracked south of the Trans-Canada Highway. It damaged cereals, oilseeds, pulses, corn and other specialty crops, he said.

“This storm was extremely wet and brought lots of rain,” he said. “Producers should be patient as we work to investigate claims and leave adequate samples for adjusters.”

An appropriate check strip for crop damage is at least 20 by 30 feet in the four corners and in the middle of the field.

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, also said the rain is slowing investigations.

“We ask that all producers remain patient as the ground saturation from recent heavy rainfall has greatly delayed the speed in which our adjusters can investigate claims,” he said.

CCHA member companies are finishing adjustments for summer storm damage.

Bantle said August storm claims are now complete at Cooperative Hail. They are at the 5-year average for that month. The average payable claim in August was slightly below the 5-year average, indicating less damage to crops.

September, he said, is a different story.

A major storm on Sept. 17, and other storms, pushed the number of claims above the 5-year average. Damage is also more severe with the average payable claim now almost double the 5-year average for September, Bantle said.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Farmers Report Late Season Storm with Damaging Hail and Rain in Western Canada

Famers in western Canada reported a severe storm that dropped golf ball-size hail in some areas and up to 5 inches of rain on crops that were ready for harvest, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storm was one of several that occurred Sept. 15-20.

CCHA members companies are investigating more than 980 claims of hail damage in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period with claims still coming in.

The storm on Sept. 17 appears to have been the most destructive, CCHA member companies said.

“There is significant damage from this late season storm,” said Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail. “There was heavy rain in some areas of this storm path with the highest reported rainfall accumulation of around 5 inches. It was a slow-moving storm. In the core of the storm path, crops are completely destroyed. The heavy rainfall in some of these areas will make adjusting challenging. We are all hoping for sunshine, warm temperatures and wind to help farmers harvest crops.”

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, agreed.

“The September 17 storm was very devastating,” he said. “There was lots of heavy damage to crops that were ready to harvest. The heavy rain that came with this storm could slow down adjusting due to field conditions.”

CCHA member companies also reported damage to nearly all crops in Manitoba and Alberta during the time period.

The late-season storm activity comes as farmers are completing harvest and insurance adjusters are working to investigate claims head of the combines.

Bantle said leaving a good sample for adjusters is critical right now.

“With the number of claims in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, farmers should contact their insurance companies to determine check strips for adjusters to use prior to harvest,” he said.

Generally, he said, an appropriate check strip is at least 20 by 30 feet in the four corners and in the middle of the field.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Farmers Report Moderate Storm Activity Across Western Canada

Farmers in western Canada reported moderate storm activity with minor to heavy hail damage depending on the ripeness of the crops, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 1-13.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 530 claims of hail damage in Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the time period.

Saskatchewan had the most activity with about two-thirds of the claims reported in that province.

Farmers reported varying damage depending on the ripeness of crops after a Sept. 2 storm, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

“Hail stones were smaller pea-sized,” he said. “Rain and wind are also factors in assessing crop damage.”

Storms Sept. 1-4 in Saskatchewan resulted in heavy damage in some cases to cereals, oilseeds, and pulses, according to Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company.

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance Company, said storms on Sept. 2 and Sept. 4 produced pea-sized hail.

“The damage was light to medium with the latest storms,” he said. “With harvest in full swing, we are maximizing all available adjusters so we can service our claims as quickly as possible to avoid producers having to leave samples.”

Farmers reported damage to wheat, canola, soybeans and flax after storms Sept. 4-6 in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, according to Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service.

In Manitoba, a Sept. 5 storm produced hail that resulted in light to medium damage to cereals, soybeans, canola, and edible beans, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

“We’re just working to try to stay ahead of the combines,” he said.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Scattered Storms Result in Varying Crop Damage Across Western Canada

Farmers in western Canada reported scattered storm activity with pea-size hail in some cases, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 1-6.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 500 claims of hail damage in Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Saskatchewan had the most activity with more than half of the claims reported in that province.

Farmers reported light to heavy damage from storms Sept. 1-4, according to Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. Damaged crops included cereals, oilseeds, pulses.

A Sept. 2 storm resulted in varying damage depending on the ripeness of the crops, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

Storms on Sept. 2 and 4 resulted in pea-sized hail, according to Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance.

“The damage was light to medium damage with the latest storm dates,” he said. “With harvest in full swing, we are maximizing all available adjusters so we can service our claims as quickly as possible to avoid producers having to leave samples.”

Farmers in Manitoba reported minor to moderate damage to cereals, soybeans, canola, and edible beans after a Sept. 5 storm, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

“The bulk of the storm started at Crystal City and traveled east toward Snowflake and Darlingford,” he said. “There were a few claims even further East in Morden and Altona.”

Storms Sept. 4-6 also hit Manitoba damaging wheat, canola, soybeans, flax and other crops, according to CCHA member companies.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Storm Activity Sporadic Across Western Canada

Farmers reported sporadic storm activity across western Canada with pea-sized hail and a range of crop damage, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Aug 15-29.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 700 claims made by farmers in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Storms between Aug. 24 and Aug. 29 in Manitoba and Saskatchewan were the most severe, resulting in more than 500 claims of hail damage filed with two CCHA member companies.

Pea-sized hail was reported resulting in minor to moderate damage to cereals, soybeans, canola, corn, sunflowers and other crops.

“A large amount of rain came with the storms,” said Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. “We are busy now trying to stay ahead of the combines as harvest is well underway in Manitoba.”

In other communities across western Canada, farmers made dozens of claims of hail damage during the time period to all types of crops as the growing season nears its end.

CCHA member companies continue to process claims and get much-needed relief to farmers.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said June adjustments are complete. The company’s number of claims are below the 5-year average in June. July adjustments are nearly complete with claims numbers coming in above average. August is more than half complete with claims coming in below average, he said.

CCHA continues to urge farmers to contact their member company with any questions about leaving adequate samples for adjusters to assess crop damages.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Storm Activity Spotty Across Western Canada

Farmers reported spotty storm activity across western Canada with heavy damage and golf ball-sized hail in at least one area, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Aug. 2-14.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 280 claims made by farmers in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Storms on Aug. 6 in Alberta appear to be the most severe with pea-to-golf-ball sized stones and at least 90 damage claims in communities including Cochrane, One Four, Iron Springs, Taber, Foremost and Lethbridge, according to CCHA members.

Storms on Aug. 14 also resulted in damage across the three provinces.

The storms that day hit Alberta communities from Claresholm to south of Taber and a large area northwest of Medicine Hat. In Manitoba, farmers in Souris and the Hartney area reported damage along with farmers in parts of Saskatchewan.

Harvest is starting across the area and CCHA members are urging farmers to leave enough samples of damage crops in the field to provide for accurate assessments.

“Harvest has started and staying ahead of the combines will begin to be an issue,” said Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

CCHA member companies continue to process claims and get much-needed funds to farmers as the hail season nears its end.

“So far we have completed 89 percent of our June claims with payable claims slightly below average,” said Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. “July is 71 percent adjusted with claims above the average. August is 3 percent adjusted with completed claims above average.”

Farmers are urged to contact their CCHA member company with any questions about leaving adequate samples for adjusters to assess crop damages.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

 

Farmers Urged to Leave Samples of Hail Damage as Harvest Begins

Farmers are urged to leave adequate samples of damaged crops as harvest begins across western Canada so insurance adjusters can accurately process claims, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

Harvest is beginning after a hail storm season that, so far, is tracking close to last year. Farmers have made about 10,000 claims. The hail season ends in October.

A representative sample size of damaged crops is critical to assessing a claim. Insurance adjusters are available to answer any questions farmers may have about how much of a damaged crop is required for a good sample.

“Adjusters need good samples so they can properly determine losses,” said Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance Company. “Please get in touch with your Canadian Crop Hail Association member company if you are unsure what to leave for a sample.”

Farmers across all three western provinces reported hail damage between Aug. 2-14.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 200 claims made during the time period.

Farmers in the Alberta communities of Iron Springs, Taber, Foremost and Lethbridge reported heavy damage from pea to golf ball-sized hail, according to Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service.

Areas from Athabasca to Plamondo, Drayton Valley, Thorsby to Tofield, Morinville and Woodland County also saw damage, according to Jackie Sanden of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation. The Vergeville area reported damage as did the area between Cochrane and Onefour, she said. Several storm cells hit Claresholm, Taber and a large area north of Medicine Hat.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said farmers reported damage to cereal, pulse and oilseed. Storms hit the Saskatchewan communities of Carrot River, Watrous, Frobisher, Moosomin, Redvers, Yorkton, Chamberlain, Craven, Pense, Estevan and Regina, he said.

The Manitoba communities of Benito, Portage and Hartney also suffered crop damage, he said.

Also in Saskatchewan, farmers in Melville, Willowbunch, Mossbank, Central Butte, Eyebrow, Oungre, Torquay, Pense and Grand Coulee reported hail damage, according to Daryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.