Farmers Report Hail Damage, Flooding in Western Canada

Heavy rain and flooding are contributing to crop damage from hailstorms in parts of western Canada, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred June 20-28 and July 2-4.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 120 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged wheat, canola and beans in southern Manitoba from La Riviere Plum Coulee to Stienbach and also in Rossburn. Damage reports range from light to heavy with reports still coming in.

Also in Manitoba, storms damaged cereal, pulses and oilseeds in Brandon, Foxwarren, Rossburn and Hamiota, Melita, Reston.

“There was some flooding with large amounts of rain through the Brandon region,” Bantle said.

In Saskatchewan, Bantle said scattered storms damaged crops in Churchbridge, Calder, Biggar and Estevan. A larger storm on July 2 damaged crops in Arborfield, Carrot River, Melfort, Lake Lenore, Tisdale. He said farmers are reporting heavy damage in Tisdale.

Also in Saskatchewan, storms damaged cereals, canola and peas in Neudorf and Plenty.

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged crops in Saskatchewan near Star City, Semans, and, Assiniboia.

“Farmers reported hail damage for a series of storms that occurred throughout the entire week in Saskatchewan,” she said.

In Manitoba, she said farmers reported damage to barley, soybeans, canola, and oats in Brandon and Hamiota. In Alberta, farmers reported damage to barley and canola in Coalhurst, Coaldale, Holt said. Farmers also reported a storm in the Lethbridge area.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Neerlandia, Thorhild, Warner, Chin, Nobleford, Turin, Millarville, Medicine Hat and Hilda. The damage was variable and is still under investigation.

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance, said storms damaged crops in southern Alberta. Details were not immediately available. She also reported damage in Saskatchewan.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the farmers across Canada. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc, Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd., New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission and Palliser Insurance Company Ltd.

 

Early summer storms damage crops across Canada

Early summer storms across Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba produced hail that resulted in mostly light to medium crop damage with heavy damage reported in some areas, according to according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred May 26, June 4, June 9, June 13-17.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 200 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, says a storm damaged peas in Cadillac community of Saskatchewan.

“The damage was generally minimal since it is an early storm and the crop is in its early stage of growth,” he said.

Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service reported damage to crops in the Alberta communities of Taber, Coaldale, Vauxhall and damage in Albertville in Saskatchewan.

“The wind was a large factor within the Albertville storm as well,” he said.

Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation reported damage to fall rye, wheat, canola, soybeans, sunflowers in the Manitoba communities of Altona, Elkhorn and Miniota.

“Fall rye in Altona had some severe damage,” he said. “All other crops had minor damage.”

He said high winds are a factor in adjusting the claims.

Murray Bantle of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company reported light to medium damage to beans, wheat and canola across Manitoba. He also reported light to heavy damage to wheat, canola and peas in Saskatchewan.

Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance Company reported minor damage to peas and canola in Alberta.

CCHA member companies are reminding customers to review and understand the new COVID-19 protocols designed to keep adjusters and policy holders as safe as possible.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the farmers across Canada. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc, Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd., New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission and Palliser Insurance Company Ltd.

Farmers Prepare for 2020 Hail Season

Canadian Crop Hail Association member companies are ready to safely help farmers lock in their hail insurance coverage for the 2020 season by following COVID-19 guidelines.

Member companies will follow all government directives and adhere to government social distancing requirements. They will allow only the owner/operator in a vehicle at any time, which means no passengers. They will also use disinfecting solutions to wipe down equipment and contact points, among other safety measures.

“This is an unprecedented time in Canadian agriculture, and we want our customers to know their safety, and the safety of our agents, is our top priority,” said Rick Omelchenko, president of the Canadian Crop Hail Association. “We are ready to help farmers manage the risks of Mother Nature as the storm season approaches with the same great service and expert advice we have provided for years.”

CCHA is expanding this year with the addition of a member in New Brunswick.

“We are pleased to welcome the New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission to CCHA and excited about expanding our partnership in the east,” Omelchenko said. “This growth will increase industry participation and, in turn, provide more value to our customers.”

Last year, Canadian Crop Hail Association member companies covered more than $6.5 billion in crops. Companies paid $242 million on 16,200 claims.

Overall, Saskatchewan was hit hardest last year with an industry loss ratio of 95 percent compared to 66 percent in 2018. Alberta followed with a 90 percent loss ratio compared to 42.5 percent. Manitoba had an 85 percent loss ratio compared to 81.5 percent in 2018. The industrywide loss ratio was 92 percent in 2019 compared to 63.5 percent in 2018.

“The 2019 harvest was a challenge. We had damaging storms, cool wet weather and early snow that meant not all farmers were able to complete harvest,” Omelchenko said. “Conditions vary across Canada every season. Farmers should closely consider their hail coverage levels as we enter the storm season.”

CCHA recommends that producers have hail coverage in place early in the season. Producers may not be able to purchase hail coverage after crops are damaged by a storm, which means they would carry the full risk for the remainder of the year.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the farmers across Canada. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc, Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd., New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission and Palliser Insurance Company Ltd.

 

CHHA Thanks Farmers as Hail Season Ends

Members of the Canadian Crop Hail Association are proud to have helped farmers in western Canada manage the risks of Mother Nature as hail season ends, the association’s president said.

“Our members companies are honored to support farmers across Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan with crop insurance that helps them manage risk and remain in a strong financial position for another growing season,” said Rick Omelchenko, CCHA president. “We want to thank all of our customers across the provinces for their business and patience during yet another season of unusual weather in western Canada.”

CCHA members are finalizing the last of the region’s hail damage claims and analyzing data about storm activity and crop damage for a year-end report that will be released soon.

September is shaping up to be the most damaging month with a series of late season hailstorms and flooding rain that hit crops right at harvest time.

“Overall, farmers are telling our member companies that the 2019 harvest was a challenge with damaging storms, cool wet weather and snow storms, and not all were able to complete harvest,” Omelchenko said. “We congratulate growers who were able to get their crops in the bin, and hope the remaining crop left out also gets in.  The Canadian Crop Hail Association always hopes everyone has a great harvest and looks forward to serving them again next season.”

It’s never too early to start planning insurance coverage for next season, Omelchenko said

“Please contact our local CCHA member company and let us help you find the insurance products you need to protect your investment and manage weather risks,” he said.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Hail Damage Decreases Across Western Canada

Farmers reported a decrease in hail damage across western Canada with colder weather that has meant less storm activity, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 28-30 and Oct. 14 and 19.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 53 claims of crop damage in Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, says storms damaged soybean, wheat and canola in Manitoba.

More than 80 percent of claims for Manitoba are complete, he said.

In Saskatchewan, pea-size hail damaged canola, wheat, barley, flax, soybeans, Bantle said.

Excessive moisture and the natural breakdown of crops are among factors in adjusting, Bantle said.

Claims adjustments in Saskatchewan are nearly complete, he said.

“Damage from the September storm is well above the 5-year average,” Bantle said.

Storms in September were costly due to the amount of unharvested ripe crop still in the fields, Bantle said.

Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail also reported hail damage in Saskatchewan with rain and snow among factors in adjusting.

“We are currently finishing adjusting claims from late September in the South Central and South East parts of Saskatchewan,” he said. “This has been challenging due to the high moisture levels in some areas as well as the unwelcome snowfalls.”

All claims are nearing completion for Rain and Hail Insurance, said Tyson Ryhorchuk.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Wet Fields Continue to Slow Hail Damage Investigations Across Western Canada

Heavy rain and wet fields continue to slow crop damage investigations as farmers report a new round of hailstorms across western Canada, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 17-30.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 640 claims of crop damage in Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the time period.

Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service said a Sept. 24 storm in Manitoba resulted claims of damage to canola, soybeans, wheat and oats. Damage ranged from light to medium. Rainfall is a factor as adjusters investigate.

“We ask that all producers remain patient as the ground saturation from recent heavy rainfall has greatly delayed the speed in which our adjusters can investigate claims,” he said.

Murray Bantle of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company also said rain is a factor in investigating a series of storms in Manitoba on Sept. 20, 21 and 24 that damaged cereals, oilseeds, pulses, corn and other specialty crops.

“These storms were extremely wet with lots of rain recently,” he said. “Producers should be patient and ensure adequate samples are left.”

An appropriate check strip for crop damage is at least 20 by 30 feet in the four corners and in the middle of the field.

August storm claims filed with Cooperative Hail are complete, Bantle said. The number of claims is within the 5-year average. The average payable claim was slight below the 5-year average in August, he said.

September claims are 62 percent complete. Damage from the September storms is above the 5-year average so far, he said. Storms Sept. 17-20 were costly due to the amount of unharvested ripe crop still in the fields and severity of the storms, Bantle said.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Heavy Rain From Late Season Storms Slows Crop Damage Investigations

Farmers in western Canada reported scattered but damaging storms that dropped golf-ball sized hail in some cases along with heavy rain that is slowing investigations, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 20-25. New reports from damaging storms on Sept. 17 and 18 continue to come in.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 700 claims of hail damage to all crops in in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, said the late fall storm system was wide and mainly tracked south of the Trans-Canada Highway. It damaged cereals, oilseeds, pulses, corn and other specialty crops, he said.

“This storm was extremely wet and brought lots of rain,” he said. “Producers should be patient as we work to investigate claims and leave adequate samples for adjusters.”

An appropriate check strip for crop damage is at least 20 by 30 feet in the four corners and in the middle of the field.

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, also said the rain is slowing investigations.

“We ask that all producers remain patient as the ground saturation from recent heavy rainfall has greatly delayed the speed in which our adjusters can investigate claims,” he said.

CCHA member companies are finishing adjustments for summer storm damage.

Bantle said August storm claims are now complete at Cooperative Hail. They are at the 5-year average for that month. The average payable claim in August was slightly below the 5-year average, indicating less damage to crops.

September, he said, is a different story.

A major storm on Sept. 17, and other storms, pushed the number of claims above the 5-year average. Damage is also more severe with the average payable claim now almost double the 5-year average for September, Bantle said.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Farmers Report Late Season Storm with Damaging Hail and Rain in Western Canada

Famers in western Canada reported a severe storm that dropped golf ball-size hail in some areas and up to 5 inches of rain on crops that were ready for harvest, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storm was one of several that occurred Sept. 15-20.

CCHA members companies are investigating more than 980 claims of hail damage in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period with claims still coming in.

The storm on Sept. 17 appears to have been the most destructive, CCHA member companies said.

“There is significant damage from this late season storm,” said Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail. “There was heavy rain in some areas of this storm path with the highest reported rainfall accumulation of around 5 inches. It was a slow-moving storm. In the core of the storm path, crops are completely destroyed. The heavy rainfall in some of these areas will make adjusting challenging. We are all hoping for sunshine, warm temperatures and wind to help farmers harvest crops.”

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, agreed.

“The September 17 storm was very devastating,” he said. “There was lots of heavy damage to crops that were ready to harvest. The heavy rain that came with this storm could slow down adjusting due to field conditions.”

CCHA member companies also reported damage to nearly all crops in Manitoba and Alberta during the time period.

The late-season storm activity comes as farmers are completing harvest and insurance adjusters are working to investigate claims head of the combines.

Bantle said leaving a good sample for adjusters is critical right now.

“With the number of claims in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, farmers should contact their insurance companies to determine check strips for adjusters to use prior to harvest,” he said.

Generally, he said, an appropriate check strip is at least 20 by 30 feet in the four corners and in the middle of the field.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Farmers Report Moderate Storm Activity Across Western Canada

Farmers in western Canada reported moderate storm activity with minor to heavy hail damage depending on the ripeness of the crops, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 1-13.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 530 claims of hail damage in Saskatchewan and Manitoba during the time period.

Saskatchewan had the most activity with about two-thirds of the claims reported in that province.

Farmers reported varying damage depending on the ripeness of crops after a Sept. 2 storm, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

“Hail stones were smaller pea-sized,” he said. “Rain and wind are also factors in assessing crop damage.”

Storms Sept. 1-4 in Saskatchewan resulted in heavy damage in some cases to cereals, oilseeds, and pulses, according to Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company.

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance Company, said storms on Sept. 2 and Sept. 4 produced pea-sized hail.

“The damage was light to medium with the latest storms,” he said. “With harvest in full swing, we are maximizing all available adjusters so we can service our claims as quickly as possible to avoid producers having to leave samples.”

Farmers reported damage to wheat, canola, soybeans and flax after storms Sept. 4-6 in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, according to Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service.

In Manitoba, a Sept. 5 storm produced hail that resulted in light to medium damage to cereals, soybeans, canola, and edible beans, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

“We’re just working to try to stay ahead of the combines,” he said.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Scattered Storms Result in Varying Crop Damage Across Western Canada

Farmers in western Canada reported scattered storm activity with pea-size hail in some cases, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Sept. 1-6.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 500 claims of hail damage in Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Saskatchewan had the most activity with more than half of the claims reported in that province.

Farmers reported light to heavy damage from storms Sept. 1-4, according to Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. Damaged crops included cereals, oilseeds, pulses.

A Sept. 2 storm resulted in varying damage depending on the ripeness of the crops, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

Storms on Sept. 2 and 4 resulted in pea-sized hail, according to Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance.

“The damage was light to medium damage with the latest storm dates,” he said. “With harvest in full swing, we are maximizing all available adjusters so we can service our claims as quickly as possible to avoid producers having to leave samples.”

Farmers in Manitoba reported minor to moderate damage to cereals, soybeans, canola, and edible beans after a Sept. 5 storm, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

“The bulk of the storm started at Crystal City and traveled east toward Snowflake and Darlingford,” he said. “There were a few claims even further East in Morden and Altona.”

Storms Sept. 4-6 also hit Manitoba damaging wheat, canola, soybeans, flax and other crops, according to CCHA member companies.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.