Storm Activity Sporadic Across Western Canada

Farmers reported sporadic storm activity across western Canada with pea-sized hail and a range of crop damage, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Aug 15-29.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 700 claims made by farmers in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Storms between Aug. 24 and Aug. 29 in Manitoba and Saskatchewan were the most severe, resulting in more than 500 claims of hail damage filed with two CCHA member companies.

Pea-sized hail was reported resulting in minor to moderate damage to cereals, soybeans, canola, corn, sunflowers and other crops.

“A large amount of rain came with the storms,” said Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. “We are busy now trying to stay ahead of the combines as harvest is well underway in Manitoba.”

In other communities across western Canada, farmers made dozens of claims of hail damage during the time period to all types of crops as the growing season nears its end.

CCHA member companies continue to process claims and get much-needed relief to farmers.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said June adjustments are complete. The company’s number of claims are below the 5-year average in June. July adjustments are nearly complete with claims numbers coming in above average. August is more than half complete with claims coming in below average, he said.

CCHA continues to urge farmers to contact their member company with any questions about leaving adequate samples for adjusters to assess crop damages.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Storm Activity Spotty Across Western Canada

Farmers reported spotty storm activity across western Canada with heavy damage and golf ball-sized hail in at least one area, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Aug. 2-14.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 280 claims made by farmers in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

Storms on Aug. 6 in Alberta appear to be the most severe with pea-to-golf-ball sized stones and at least 90 damage claims in communities including Cochrane, One Four, Iron Springs, Taber, Foremost and Lethbridge, according to CCHA members.

Storms on Aug. 14 also resulted in damage across the three provinces.

The storms that day hit Alberta communities from Claresholm to south of Taber and a large area northwest of Medicine Hat. In Manitoba, farmers in Souris and the Hartney area reported damage along with farmers in parts of Saskatchewan.

Harvest is starting across the area and CCHA members are urging farmers to leave enough samples of damage crops in the field to provide for accurate assessments.

“Harvest has started and staying ahead of the combines will begin to be an issue,” said Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

CCHA member companies continue to process claims and get much-needed funds to farmers as the hail season nears its end.

“So far we have completed 89 percent of our June claims with payable claims slightly below average,” said Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. “July is 71 percent adjusted with claims above the average. August is 3 percent adjusted with completed claims above average.”

Farmers are urged to contact their CCHA member company with any questions about leaving adequate samples for adjusters to assess crop damages.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

 

Farmers Urged to Leave Samples of Hail Damage as Harvest Begins

Farmers are urged to leave adequate samples of damaged crops as harvest begins across western Canada so insurance adjusters can accurately process claims, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

Harvest is beginning after a hail storm season that, so far, is tracking close to last year. Farmers have made about 10,000 claims. The hail season ends in October.

A representative sample size of damaged crops is critical to assessing a claim. Insurance adjusters are available to answer any questions farmers may have about how much of a damaged crop is required for a good sample.

“Adjusters need good samples so they can properly determine losses,” said Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance Company. “Please get in touch with your Canadian Crop Hail Association member company if you are unsure what to leave for a sample.”

Farmers across all three western provinces reported hail damage between Aug. 2-14.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 200 claims made during the time period.

Farmers in the Alberta communities of Iron Springs, Taber, Foremost and Lethbridge reported heavy damage from pea to golf ball-sized hail, according to Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service.

Areas from Athabasca to Plamondo, Drayton Valley, Thorsby to Tofield, Morinville and Woodland County also saw damage, according to Jackie Sanden of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation. The Vergeville area reported damage as did the area between Cochrane and Onefour, she said. Several storm cells hit Claresholm, Taber and a large area north of Medicine Hat.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said farmers reported damage to cereal, pulse and oilseed. Storms hit the Saskatchewan communities of Carrot River, Watrous, Frobisher, Moosomin, Redvers, Yorkton, Chamberlain, Craven, Pense, Estevan and Regina, he said.

The Manitoba communities of Benito, Portage and Hartney also suffered crop damage, he said.

Also in Saskatchewan, farmers in Melville, Willowbunch, Mossbank, Central Butte, Eyebrow, Oungre, Torquay, Pense and Grand Coulee reported hail damage, according to Daryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Saskatchewan leads in hail damage claims at mid-year

Farmers in Saskatchewan have reported the most damage from hail storms so far this year with nearly 7,000 claims filed with Canadian Crop Hail Association member companies, according to mid-year data.

In total, CCHA companies have received more than 10,000 claims across Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan and have completed processing on 46 percent of those.

Claim activity in Manitoba is down somewhat over the 5-year average while Alberta and Saskatchewan are up slightly, said Rick Omelchenko, CCHA president. Claims are on a similar pace to 2018, which saw more than 11,000 filed by the end of the year. The hail season ends in October.

“CCHA member companies have been working hard to support farmers across western Canada this summer,” Omelchenko said. “We’ve processed nearly half of the claims already and that means farmers can rest assured they will have the capital they need to continue growing the high-quality affordable food that Canada, and the world, relies on next season.”

CCHA members continue to gather claims data. The most recent approximate numbers show:

  • Alberta: 2,000 claims
  • Manitoba: 1,300 claims
  • Saskatchewan: 6,900 claims

Hail damage is not the only factor farmers must contend with as they approach harvest, Omelchenko said.

“Harvest might be better in Manitoba with the decrease in hail claims but extremely wet weather in some places and extremely dry weather in other provinces will also have an impact on harvest volumes,” Omelchenko said. “We know how hard our farmers work to grow a great crop and we are honored to support them with hail coverage that reduces the risk they face from Mother Nature each season.”

Storm activity between July 27 and Aug. 6 generally continued to decrease though some places recorded baseball-size hail.

Farmers in the three western provinces made 900 claims so far during that time period with reports still being received.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

 

Farmers report less hail damage across western Canada with milder weather

Farmers in western Canada got a break from the severe weather they saw earlier in July though storms continued to produce hail that damaged crops, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred July 22-26.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 300 claims made by farmers in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

The number of claims is lower than the more than 3,000 reported July 6-18. Claims from that time period are still coming in and continue to be investigated.

Farmers in the Alberta communities of Forty Mile, Cypress County, Flagstaff County, Wainwright and Provost reported hail damage from storms on July 23, according to Jackie Sanden of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation.

Farmers reported damage in Leduc and Wetaskiwin and scattered areas between Wainwright and St Paul on July 24, Sanden said.

In Manitoba, a July 22 storm produced pea-sized hail that damaged crops in Sanford, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

The bulk of the claims reported so far came from farmers in the Saskatchewan communities of Landis, Kelfield, North Battleford, Davidson, Simpson, Cupar, Southey, Mossbank and Assiniboia after storms on July 22 and 28, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

“This week was slower and less severe,” he said. “The storm dates of July 11-14 and July 18 are proving to be the largest number of claims so far this year.”

Also in Saskatchewan, hail damaged crops in Gull Lake, Canora, Cutknife, Battleford, Elrose, and Spiritwood on July 19, according to Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. Hail also damaged crops in Frobisher on July 25 and in Cutknife and Battleford on July 27, Bantle said. He said cereals, legumes, oilseeds had light to heavy damage.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Farmers File Thousands of Hail Damage Reports Across Western Canada

Storms across western Canada produced hail as large as tennis balls resulting in severe crop damage in some cases, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred almost every day July 6-18.

CCHA member companies are investigating 3,241 claims made by farmers in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan during the time period.

The Saskatchewan communities of Eston, Kindersley, Craik, Craven, Balcarres, Indian Head, and Sintaluta had the largest number of reported damages with 1,200 claims, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

The storms occurred July 13-18. Some of the hail stones were larger than a golf ball, he said. All crops in the area were damaged.

Storms on July 6-8 and July 11-12 produced pea-to-golf ball sized hail in Saskatchewan resulting in light to heavy damage, according to Murry Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. Farmers made 159 claims.

Storms in Kindersley, Easton, Abbey, Dinsmore, Outlook, Lumsden, Indian Head, Esterhazy, Kerrobert, Luselnad, Bigger, Radisson, Hepburn, Rostern, Cudworth, Humboldt, Kelvington. Lampman and Redvers on July 13-18 resulted in 304 claims to cereals, pulses and oilseeds, according to Bantle.

Co-operative Hail Insurance Company customers in Manitoba filed 26 claims after storms July 8 and 11 damaged oilseeds, pulses, cereals, Bantle said.

Manitoba farmers in Brandon, Rapid City, St Cloud and Morden filed 39 claims after hail damaged crops July 13-17, he said. The storms hit west-central Manitoba to southeast of Winnipeg.

“So far we have completed 76 percent of our June storm adjustments with below the 5-year average payouts,” Bantle said. “July 1-10 storms are 23 percent adjusted with average claims so far below the 5-year average. However, some of the outstanding early July storms have been deferred.”

Farmers in the Manitoba communities of Roseisle, Brunkild and Russell made 123 claims after toonie-sized hail damaged cereals, canola, soybeans, edible beans and corn, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. The storms occurred July 9 and 11.

Farmers in the Hamiota area made 377 claims after a July 15 storm produced pea to toonie-sized hail, Blight said. Canola, cereals, peas and soybeans were damaged.

“High humidity and moisture have led to storms popping up all over the province but the Russell to Hamiota area seems to be the hardest hit,” he said.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said farmers in Alberta reported damage from storms July 13-18. The claims are being investigated.

Farmers in the Saskatchewan communities of Carrot River, Aylsham, Torquay, Avonlea and Val Marie; the Alberta communities of Barons, Nanton, Provost, Mannsville; and the Manitoba community of Russell reported 13 claims after storms on July 6-8.

Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance Company said storms on July 14 and 15 produced hail up to the size of a tennis ball. He said Palliser is investigating about 1,000 claims in Saskatchewan and Alberta.

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Storms damage crops in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan

Storms in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan produced hail that resulted in crop damage, with some areas sustaining heavy damage, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred July 6-9 and July 11-12.

CCHA member companies are investigating 821 claims in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan made by farmers after the storms.

More than half of those claims were made by farmers across Saskatchewan after storms resulted in damage ranging from minimal to heavy. Storms in Lampman, Willow Bunch, Assiniboia, Mortlach, Chaplin, Moose Jaw, Rosthern, Wakaw, Foam Lake, Melfort and several other communities caused damage to a wide variety of crops, according to Darryl TIefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail.

“Rain and strong winds resulted in substantial damage in some of the core areas of the storms,” said TIefenbach.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said near-daily storms in Saskatchewan produced pea to golf ball-sized hail and damaged cereals, pulse crops, and oilseeds. Co-operative Hail Insurance Company is processing 159 claims from these early July storms.

Co-operative Hail Insurance Company is processing an additional 26 claims resulting from storms in Manitoba.

Bantle said Co-operative Hail Insurance Company is progressing on adjusting June claims.

“While the costs of claims in June settled so far are below the 5-year average, the number of days with hail was slightly above the 5-year average,” he says.

Two storms in Manitoba resulted in claims in Roseisle, Brunkild and Russell, reported Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation. Toonie-sized stones resulted in minimum to moderate damage to cereals, canola, soybeans, edible beans and corn.

“Some areas received large amounts of moisture, which will factor into claims,” Blight said.

Farmers in the Alberta communities of Barons, Nanton, Provost, Mannsville, the Saskatchewan communities of Carrot River, Aylsham, Torquay, Avonlea and Val Marie, and Russell in Manitoba filed 13 claims resulting from storms occurring July 6-8, according to Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service.

For more: cropinsuranceincanada.org

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Early season storms damage crops across Western Canada

Storms in all three western Canadian provinces produced hail that resulted in light to heavy crop damage, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred June 21-27.

CCHA member companies are investigating 162 claims in Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan with claims still coming in from some of the storms.

Farmers in the Saskatchewan communities of Oungre, Midale, Moose Jaw, Rush Lake, Glenavon, Montmartre, Bethune, Craik, Wilkie, and Maple Creek were hardest hit. Storms nearly every day resulted in 77 claims, according to Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail.

“The hail activity was sporadic with stones that ranged from pea to loonie-sized,” he said. “The storms also produced significant rainfall.”

In Alberta, farmers in Taber made four claims after a storm damaged dry beans, potatoes and sugar beets, according to Jackie Sanden of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation.

Farmers in Lacombe, Pipestone, Killam and Vegreville made five claims after a storm damaged corn, wheat, canola, barley and peas, Sanden said. A separate in storm Vergeville resulted in three claims for damage to barley, canola and wheat.

Farmers in Bentley, Marwayne, Barrhead, Westlock, Morrinville, and Radway made nine claims after a storm damaged wheat, canola and barley, Sanden said. And in Ryley, Bruderheim, Vegreville, Derwent, Morrinville, Beaverlodge, farmers made nine claims for damage to canola, wheat, oats, barley and peas.

In Saskatchewan, farmers made 17 claims after a storm damaged cereals, oilseed and legumes in Assiniboia, Chamberlain, Odessa, Delams, Glenavon, Sedley, Tompkins, and Fox Valley, according to Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company.

In Manitoba, farmers in St. Alphonse, Mariapolis, Russell and Killarney made four claims after a storm damaged oilseed and cereals, Bantle said.

Also in Manitoba, farmers made 34 claims after a storm damaged cereals, canola, soybeans in Pilot Mound, Alexander, Dugald/Oakbank, Miniota, Russell, Inglis, Swan River and Birch River, according to Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation.

“Heat over the last few weeks has produced small localized storms throughout the province,” he said.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

 

Storms damage crops in Alberta, Saskatchewan

Storms in Alberta and Saskatchewan produced hail that resulted in light to medium crop damage with heavy damage reported in at least one area, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred on June 15, June 17, June 18 and June 19.

CCHA member companies are investigating 128 claims with nearly half in the Saskatchewan communities of Assiniboia, Willowbunch, Ogema, Gravelbourg, Maple Creek, Elrose, Rosetown and Pierceland.

“We are seeing isolated thunderstorm damage,” said Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company. “The hail activity was light for the week. We finally got some moisture across much of the province.”

Co-operative Hail has six claims in Gull Lake and Gravelbourg. Barley and durum suffered light to heavy damage.

Farmers made eight claims in Didsbury, Three Hills, Joffre, Beiseker, Hussar, Rockyford and Morrinville, according to Jackie Sanden of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation in Alberta.

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, said farmers in the Saskatchewan communities of Consul, Ponteix and the Alberta communities of Trochu, Picture Butte, Coaldale and Coalhurst made six claims for damage to wheat, barley and mustard.

Farmers in Alberta made 10 claims to AG Direct Hail Insurance, according to Beth Shewkenek. Information about the location of the storms and the crops that were damaged was not immediately available.

Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance said storms resulted in 35 claims to all types of crops in the Alberta communities of Trochu, Three Hills and Picture Butte. Damaged ranged from light to medium. A lack of moisture is also factoring into adjustment of the claims, he said.

Storms resulted in seven claims from farmers in Josephburg, Barons, Walsh, Pontiex, and Frontier, according to Canadian Hail Agencies.

Darryl Tiefenbach of Additional Municipal Hail said storms resulted in 56 claims in the Saskatchewan communities of Assiniboia, Willowbunch, Ogema, Gravelbourg, Maple Creek, Elrose, Rosetown and Pierceland. Farmers reported light damage, he said. Heavy rain is also factoring into adjusting for the claims.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.

Early season storms damage crops across Western Canada

A series of storms across Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta produced hail that resulted in mostly light to medium damage to crops with significant damage seen in a few fields, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred May 29, June 2, June 6, June 7, June 9 and June 10. Farmers in the Saskatchewan communities of Weyburn, Midale, Ituna, Tisdale, Avonlea, Canora, Kamsack reported damage. In Manitoba, farmers in Portage, Somerset and High Bluff reported damage. And, farmers in the Alberta communities of Trochu and Westlock reported damage.

CCHA member companies are investigating 49 claims from the storms, with more than half of those in Portage and High Bluff.

Severe storms produced high winds and hail across Alberta on June 13. Damage from those storms is still being assessed and is not included in this report.

“Farmers have reported light hail on early developing crops,” said Murray Bantle of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, which has six of the claims in Weyburn and Midale.

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, said pea-sized hail resulted in light damage to crops in Somerset and Trochu. Rain and Hail Insurance Services has three claims.

“We expect to see light losses at the early stage of wheat and canola development,” he said.

Farmers in Tisdale, Avonlea, Canora and Kamsack reported small stones and light damage, said Rodney Schoettler of Saskatchewan Municipal Hail Insurance, which has six claims.

“These were random and very isolated storms,” he said. “The stones were small, and we are expecting little to no damage. Frost and poor crop germination will also factor into adjusting for the storm damage.”

David Koroscil of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation said hail ranging from pea to toonie-size damaged edible beans, soybeans, canola in Portage and High Bluff. MASC company has 30 claims.

“We are seeing mostly moderate damage, but a couple of fields have fairly significant damage,” he said. “High wind was also a factor.”

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, reported damage to Canola and HRS Wheat in Westlock. AFSC has four claims.

Historically, June is among the most active hail periods across Western Canada. Last year, a June 14 storm destroyed crops across Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta. Some insurers said it was one of the costliest June storms on record.

“CCHA member companies are here to help farmers with the insurance coverage they need for a successful growing season in Western Canada,” said Rick Omelchenko, president of the Canadian Crop Hail Association. “Please contact a CCHA member to report storm damage or if you have questions about your coverage levels.”

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. Our companies service agriculture producers in the western prairies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the Western Canadian prairie farmer. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc., Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, Palliser Insurance Company Ltd. and Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd.