Farmers report average hail damage claims at mid-season

Hail damage claims across western Canada are average compared to this time last year with Saskatchewan leading in total claims filed so far this season, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

In total, CCHA companies have received more than 10,000 claims so far this year – a number that matches the total claims filed by August of 2019. CCHA companies have completed processing on about 67 percent of claims, which is more than they had processed by this time last year.

“This growing season has seen extreme weather across the prairies and our member companies have been working hard to quickly, and safely, process claims,” said Rick Omelchenko, CCHA president. “We have taken steps to keep adjusters and farmers safe as we continue to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve processed more than half of the claims so far, beating our turnaround time compared to last year. Farmers can rest assured they will have the capital they need to continue growing the high-quality affordable food Canada, and the world, relies on next season.”

CCHA members continue to gather claims data. Approximate mid-season numbers show:

  • Alberta: 2,667 claims
  • Manitoba: 1,208 claims
  • Saskatchewan: 6,002 claims

Even though Saskatchewan leads the pack with claims filed, it is still at the 5-year average for claim payments, Omelchenko said.

Claims filed in Alberta are currently close to last year’s numbers, but they are above the 5-year average for claim payments,” he said

“Alberta farmers were also faced with multiple hailstorms this season on the same locations and other risk factors such as wind, heavy rain, insects and disease,” Omelchenko said.

Manitoba is around the 5-year average on claims filed and below average loss payments to farmers, he said.

Harvest is underway in many places and hail damage is not the only factor farmers must contend with, Omelchenko said.

“Extremely hot weather across the prairies recently is pushing harvest slightly ahead of normal schedule in some places,” he said. “Farmers are also dealing with heavy rain in some areas and standing water in low spots that is making harvest challenging. Our member companies are moving fast to adjust for crop damage ahead of the combines. Farmers work hard each season to grow a great crop and we are proud to support them with hail coverage that reduces the risk they face from Mother Nature each season.”

Storms bring heavy rain, hail with harvest underway in western Canada

Crop insurance adjusters are working to stay ahead of the combines after storms damaged crops across western Canada with harvest well underway, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Aug. 14 and Aug. 18-22.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 300 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Langenburg and Spy Hill.

“There was 2-3 inches of rain in this area, with the hail, and that is making swathing canola challenging since the farmers are not able to see where there is standing water in some of the low spots,” he said. “Harvest is now well underway and there is a high percentage of peas and lentils being harvested through the south of the province. Conventional canola is starting to be swathed as well as cereals. The forecast for this coming week looks good for harvest to continue. A much better start to harvest in 2020 versus 2019.”

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, said storms damaged crops in the Manitoba communities of Morris, Letellier, Virden, Dominion City and Emerson. In Alberta, storms damaged crops in Wanham.

“Consistent extreme hot weather across the prairies in this past week has pushed many crops into maturity,” he said. “As it is now common see equipment moving in the fields, we would like to wish all operations a safe harvest.”

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged cereals, pulses and oilseeds in the Manitoba communities of Kenville, Roland, Altona, Binscarth, Decker, Miniota, St Jean, Emerson, Cartwright, Newdale and Russell.

“Damage is variable to ripening crops,” he said. “Please leave adequate samples for adjusters to examine the damage.”

In Saskatchewan, he said storms damaged oilseeds, cereals and pulses in Alida, Regina, Lajord, Sedley, Strongfield, Langenburg and Stockholm.

“There were various degrees of damage on ripening crops,” he said. “Pulse crops are advancing fast and the damage is heavier.”

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Kitscoty, Edgerton Mayerthorpe, Radway and Worsley.

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance, said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan community of Lagenburg.

In Alberta, he said storms damaged crops in Worsley, Wanham, Manning, Keg River, Ferintosh, Wetaskwin and Galahad. In Manitoba, storms damaged crops in Russell, Binscarth, Solsgirth, Dominion City, Virden, Hamiota, Arborg, Birtle, Isabella, Emerson, Minnedosa and Oakburn.

“Claims are starting to go quick with fields opening up due to harvest,” he said. “Better access to fields speeds up the number of claims adjusted in a day.”

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Killam and Beaver County.

In Saskatchewan, she said storms damaged crops in McCord. In Manitoba, storms damaged crops in Letellier, Dominion City, and Emerson.

Brendan Blight, of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, said storms produced pea-size hail and damaged crops in Russell and Dominion City.

“Harvest has started in lots of areas so adjustments will have to done quickly to stay ahead of the combines,” he said.

Tennis ball size hail reported in western Canada

Storms produced tennis ball size hail in some parts of western Canada along with heavy rain and high wind that damaged crops across the prairie, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred Aug. 7-15.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 800 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Choiceland and Redvers. In Alberta, she said storms damaged crops in Camrose, Drumheller, and Olds.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Bengough, Ogema, Pangman, Rouleau, Oungre, Regina, Pense, Craik, Earl Grey, Southey, Kelvington, Lintlaw, Okla, Kisbey, Arcola, Redvers and Alida.

“The system moved up in a northeasterly path and produced hail in those areas with small stones to as large as tennis balls near Lintlaw,” he said.

He said wind and rain are factors in adjusting for crop damage. Harvest is underway in the south of the province for peas, lentils and barley.

Brendan Blight, of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Manitoba communities of Virden, Alexander, Lowe Farm and Morris.

“The storm came from Saskatchewan and headed east and met another storm coming north from South Dakota,” he said.

Pea size hail resulted in minor to moderate damage. More than 2 inches of rain in some areas along with high wind are factors in adjusting for crop damage. Claims are still coming in, he said.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged cereals, pulses and oilseeds in the Manitoba communities of Virden, Solsgirth, Deloraine, Lyleton, Waskada, Alexandra, Melita, Minto, Wawanesa and Roland.

The damage ranged from light to heavy and there was tornadic activity during the localized thunderstorms, he said.

In Saskatchewan, he said storms damaged oilseeds, cereals and pulses in Estevan, Stoughton, Weyburn, Fort QuAppelle, Outlook, Unity, Avonlea, Carrot River, Chamberlain, Earl Grey, Francis, Kelvington, Lintlaw, Monmarte, Regina, Rocanville, Southey, Yorkton, Alida, Antler, Redvers, Craik and Osage.

“The storm path was from the U.S. border primarily on the east side of the province,” he said. “Pulse crops, such as peas, sustained heavy damage due to advance ripening.”

He said heavy rain is a factor in adjusting for damage.

“We continue to complete our July storms,” he said. “We are currently 84 percent complete.  The average per claim is currently on par with the 5-year average. Early hailed crops have been expensive due to severity of hail and little recovery.”

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Torrington, Wetaskiwin, New Norway, Canrose, Three Hills, Olds, Viking and Trochu.

In Manitoba, he said storms damaged crops in Reston, Sinclair, Brandon, Wawanesa, Swan River, Waskada and Labroquerie. In Saskatchewan, he said storms damaged crops in Holdfast, Grand Coulee, Wadena, Nipawin, Alida, Sedley, Rouleau and Sedley.

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Rimbey, Wetaskiwin, Falun, Viking, Panoka, Daysland, Millet, Camrose, Three Hills, Carbon, Morrin, Calgary, and Innisfree.

In Saskatchewan, she said storms damaged crops in Tribune, Kelvington, Earl Grey, Saskatoon, Carlyle, Nipawin, Crane Valley, Weyburn, Dilke, Antler, Redvers, Forget, and Lintlaw. In Manitoba, storms damaged crops in Reston, Pipestone, Nesbitt, Hamiota, and Roland.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Carseland, Cluny, Olds, Bowden, Trochu, Innisfail, Bawlf, New Norway, Falun, Wetaskiwin, Hay Lakes, New Sarepta, Linden, Swalwell, Three Hills, Morrin, Torrington.

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, said storms damaged canola, lentils, peas, wheat, durum, corn and flax in the Saskatchewan communities of Alameda, Frobisher, Sheho, Shaunavon, Ponteix and Creelman.

In Alberta, storms damaged crops in Viking, Irma, Trochu and Etzikom. In Manitoba, storms damaged crops in Melita and Killarney, he said.

“Harvest is well underway in many areas throughout the prairies,” he said. “Please be sure to leave adequate strips in fields that you are harvesting if you have a claim.”

Deadly tornado, golf-ball size hail hits western Canada

Storms produced golf-ball size hail that damaged crops across western Canada and spawned a massive tornado that killed two people in Manitoba, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of Shayna Barnesky and Carter Tilbury and the entire community in Manitoba,” said Rick Omelchenko, CCHA president. “We are here, as partners, to help the farm families impacted by this storm and the others across the region.”

The storms occurred Aug. 1-9.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 400 claims of crop damage during the time period with many claims still coming in.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged cereals, pulses and oilseeds in the Saskatchewan communities of Neilburg, Senlac, Carlyle, Lemburg, Midale, Stoughton, Consul, Estevan and Vibank.  Pea to golf-ball size hail was reported.

“For June, 98 percent of the claims have been adjusted, with a 55 percent decrease in claims reported and a 50 percent decrease in the average claim and a 4 percent increase in the number of days with reported hail from the 5-year average,” he said. “For July, 60 percent of claims have been adjusted with a 14 percent decrease in claims reported for the month. So far, our average claim is on par with the 5-year average. The number of days with claim activity is on average.”

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta community of Drumheller.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities from Crossfield to Drumheller and Consort to Provost.

They also hit Stettler to Killam and Vermilion and north to Kitscoty, Sanden said. There were pockets of claims near Water Valley, West of Didsbury and Olds, near Torrington and Trochu, and in Eckville, Warburg and Barrhead. A small number of claims were reported near Wrenthan and south of Stony Plain, she said.

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Drumheller, Rosedale, Viking, Heisler, Stettler, Barrhead, Rosebud, Strome, Forestburg, Provost, Alliance, and Killam.

In Saskatchewan, she said storms damaged crops in Cutknife, Norquay, Unity, and Consul.

“As harvest gets underway, we remind all policyholders to review their hail insurance provider’s protocol for harvesting prior to inspection,” she said.

Brendan Blight, of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, said storms damaged canola, wheat and soybeans in the Manitoba communities of Virden, Birtle and Hamiota. They produced pea-size hail and high winds with the tornado south of Virden.

He said agency offices continue to take calls about claims from these storms.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Macklin, Unity, Neilburg, Richmound, Maple Creek, Moose Jaw, Lajord, Francis, Estevan, Torquay, Midale and Lampman. He said wind and rain are factors in adjusting for damage.

“There are varying amounts of damage in the areas,” he said. “These were spotty storms and isolated in nature.”

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance, said farmers reported storms that produced half-inch hail in Alberta, Saskatchewan and parts of Manitoba. Strong wind is a factor in adjusting for damage.

“With crops now in advanced stages we are starting to see some heavier losses in the cereals and pulses,” he said. “Farmers should leave adequate test strips if they are harvesting crops prior to adjustment.”

Half-inch hail damages crops as harvest starts in some areas

Storms produced high winds and drop half-inch hail dropped across western Canada as harvest begins in some areas, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred July 23-31.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 300 claims of crop damage during the time period. They are urging farmers to leave adequate strips for adjusters in areas where harvest has started.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged canola in the Manitoba community of Swan River.

“This was a small isolated storm cell affecting northwest Manitoba,” he said.

In Saskatchewan, he said storms damaged a variety of pulses, oilseeds and cereals in Battleford, Cutknife, Rockhaven, Unity, Wilkie, Pontiex, Eastend, Foam Lake and Wadena.

“The July 25th storm in west-central Saskatchewan caused some considerable damage and a number of claims from the Alberta border to North Battleford region,” he said. “The July 29 storm was an isolated cell in the south area of Pontiex. The July 30 storms were also isolated cells affecting various regions in the province.”

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance, said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Unity and Estevan, Saskatchewan, and Drumheller.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, said storms damaged all types of crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Burstall, Insinger, Sturgis, Preeceville, Norquay and Kelvington.

“There was an isolated storm in the south west area,” he said. “The storm on July 30 in the north east was on a south easterly path. The early indication is that it is not a severe hail event.”

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged canola, oats, wheat, durum, lentils, and peas in the Saskatchewan communities of Shaunavon, Ponteix and Norquay.

In Manitoba, she said storms damaged crops in Bowsman.

Brendan Blight, of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, said storms damaged canola, wheat and soybeans in the Manitoba communities of Plumas and Austin. The storms produced pea size hail with minor damaged reported.

“The storms came from Saskatchewan and split with one going north over the lakes and the other heading south towards Morden,” he said.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Dogpound, Crossfield, Airdrie, Irricana, Drumheller, Calgary, Gleichen, Consort, Provost and Rumsey.

Tyson Ryhorchuk, of Rain and Hail Insurance Service, said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Mayfair, North Battleford, Meota, Neilburg, Unity, Oxbow, and Alameda.

In Alberta, storms damaged crops in Huxley, Trochu, Lethbridge, Coutts and Vermillion. In Manitoba, storms damaged crops in Swan River, Ninette and Minto.

“Recent hot, dry trends have crops maturing very quickly,” he said. “I have already noticed some peas being combined.”

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance Company, said storms damaged all types of crops in Saskatchewan and Alberta. They produced half-inch hail.

He said heavy wind is a factor in adjusting and damage is severe in some areas.

“With harvest starting in some southern areas, we ask that farmers leave adequate strips for the adjusters,” he said. “If they have any questions regarding timelines, please give our office a call.”

Golf ball size hail damages crops in western Canada

Storms dropped hail as large as golf balls across western Canada and produced wind and rain that will be factors in adjusting for crop damage, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred July 17-18 and July 20-25.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 1,000 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged cereals, oilseed and pulses in the Manitoba communities of Russel, Foxwarren, Rossburn, Cartwright, Gladstone, Mather and Plumas.

“Most claims this week were due to scattered thunderstorms,” he said. “July 23 was the heaviest day. Claims are still coming in.”

In Saskatchewan, he said storms damaged a variety of crops in Clavet, Saltcoates, Yorkton, Chamberlain, Lemberg, Weyburn, Alameda, Carievale, Estevan, Frobisher, Glen Ewen and North Portal.

June claims are 95 percent complete in Saskatchewan, he said. Early July claims are about 40 percent complete.

“These storms caused considerable damage in northeast Saskatchewan and south central Saskatchewan,” he said. “We currently have a number of claims deferred. We defer claims due to the fact that we are unable to determine the damage due to the stage of the crop when it was damaged. We defer to a later date to be able to assess the recovery to the plant, if any.”

Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, said storms produced pea size hail that damaged all crops in the Manitoba communities of Crystal City, Cartwright, North of Austin, south of Gladstone and Swan River.

“The July 23 storm caused minor damage,” he said. “We are still getting claims registered and getting a handle on amount of damage from the July 25 storm.”

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities between Calgary and Drumheller.

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance Company, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Brooks, Champion, Barrhead, Three Hills, Trochu, Drumheller, Olds, Beiseker, Brooks, Strathmore, Drumheller and New Brigden.

In Manitoba, he said storms damaged crops in Rossburn, Angusville, Clearwater, Crystal City and Swan River. In Saskatchewan, he said storm damaged crops in Beechy, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Carnduff, Gainsborough, Wilkie, Unity, Major, Luseland, North Battleford, Mayfair and Rabbit Lake.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Burdett, Milk River, New Dayton, Wrentham, Taber, Madden, Crossfield, Didsbury, Olds, Camp Creek, Lyalta and Cheadle.

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged canola, wheat, barley, and peas in the Saskatchewan. The storms hit the communities of Luseland, Oxbox, Alameda, Wilkie, Major, Kerrobert, Mayfair, Rockhaven, Edam, Denzil and Meota.

In Alberta, she said storms damaged barley, wheat, oats, canola, peas, lentils, and corn. The storms hit the communities of Leslieville, Huxley, Rumsey, Calgary, Drumheller, Rosebud, Carbon, Rosedale, and Provost.

In Manitoba, she said storms damaged canola, soybeans, barley, wheat, corn, and sunflower. The storms hit the communities of Gladstone, Glenboro, Clearwater, Crystal City, Dauphin and Bowsmen.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, said storms produced pea-to-nickel size hail in Saskatchewan. They damaged crops in the communities of North Battleford, Speers, Mayfair, Major, Spring Valley, Estevan, Oxbow and Alameda.

“These were spotty storms, which generally don’t have large losses,” he said.

In Saskatchewan, he said storms produced golf-ball size hail. They damaged crops in Wilkie, Unity, North Battleford, Cut Knife, Neilburg, Mayfair, Rabbit Lake, Meota and Paynton.

Wind and rain are factors in adjusting for damage, he said.

“Based on some pictures of the crops in the core of the storm path, there will be some major damage to adjust,” he said.

Farmers report heavy rain, quarter size hail across western Canada

Storms produced pea-to-quarter size hail that damaged crops across western Canada along with heavy rain in some areas that is making field access difficult for adjusters, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred July 6, July 11-14 and July 17-19.

CCHA member companies are investigating more than 2,000 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged cereals, oilseed and pulses in the Manitoba communities of Benito and Oakburn. He said the damaged ranged from light to heavy.

In Saskatchewan, he said storms damaged crops in Bladworth, Central Butte, Creelman, Foam Lake, Goodeve, Kipling, Lancer, Leader, Melville, Prelate, Wawota, Wolsely, Aberdeen, Deslisle, Edenwold, Elfross, Esterhazy, Langenburg, Lintlaw, Lipton, Melville, Milestone, Odessa, Rhein, Weeks, Wynyard, Yorkton and Sturgis.

“Many areas reporting damage was light to medium and others are reporting medium to heavy,” he said. “Saskatchewan had active early week storms last Sunday and Monday. Storms were scattered through all regions of the province.”

Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation, said storms produced pea size hail in the Manitoba communities of Swan River, Altona, Kenton, northwest of Hamiota and southeast of Birtle and Grandview. All types of crops were damaged.

“We are seeing minor damage for the most part and a few claims with moderate damage,” he said. “It was very windy during this storm.”

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance, said storms damaged crops in central Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Scott McQueen, of Palliser Insurance Company, said storms damaged crops across all three western provinces.

“Rain in certain areas is making working conditions difficult and field access limited,” he said. “Overall, crops around the prairie provinces are looking very good.”

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Bindloss, Brant, Boyle, Cremona, Chancellor, Drumheller, Buford, Waskatenau and the counties of Lacombe, Red Deer, Kneehill and Mountain View.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, said storms damaged crops in the Saskatchewan communities of Fox Valley, Glidden, Eston, Frontier, Assiniboia, Wood Mountain, Mikado. Storms also damaged crops in Leader, Eatonia, Coleville, Beechy, Lipton, Melville and Foam Lake, he said.

He said the storms produced pea-to-quarter size hail and damaged crops of all types.

“Wind and rain are factors affecting losses in some areas,” he said.

Farmers Report Hail Damage, Flooding in Western Canada

Heavy rain and flooding are contributing to crop damage from hailstorms in parts of western Canada, according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred June 20-28 and July 2-4.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 120 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Murray Bantle, of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company, said storms damaged wheat, canola and beans in southern Manitoba from La Riviere Plum Coulee to Stienbach and also in Rossburn. Damage reports range from light to heavy with reports still coming in.

Also in Manitoba, storms damaged cereal, pulses and oilseeds in Brandon, Foxwarren, Rossburn and Hamiota, Melita, Reston.

“There was some flooding with large amounts of rain through the Brandon region,” Bantle said.

In Saskatchewan, Bantle said scattered storms damaged crops in Churchbridge, Calder, Biggar and Estevan. A larger storm on July 2 damaged crops in Arborfield, Carrot River, Melfort, Lake Lenore, Tisdale. He said farmers are reporting heavy damage in Tisdale.

Also in Saskatchewan, storms damaged cereals, canola and peas in Neudorf and Plenty.

Cassandra Holt, of Canadian Hail Agencies, said storms damaged crops in Saskatchewan near Star City, Semans, and, Assiniboia.

“Farmers reported hail damage for a series of storms that occurred throughout the entire week in Saskatchewan,” she said.

In Manitoba, she said farmers reported damage to barley, soybeans, canola, and oats in Brandon and Hamiota. In Alberta, farmers reported damage to barley and canola in Coalhurst, Coaldale, Holt said. Farmers also reported a storm in the Lethbridge area.

Jackie Sanden, of Agriculture Financial Services Corporation, said storms damaged crops in the Alberta communities of Neerlandia, Thorhild, Warner, Chin, Nobleford, Turin, Millarville, Medicine Hat and Hilda. The damage was variable and is still under investigation.

Beth Shewkenek, of AG Direct Hail Insurance, said storms damaged crops in southern Alberta. Details were not immediately available. She also reported damage in Saskatchewan.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the farmers across Canada. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc, Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd., New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission and Palliser Insurance Company Ltd.

 

Early summer storms damage crops across Canada

Early summer storms across Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba produced hail that resulted in mostly light to medium crop damage with heavy damage reported in some areas, according to according to the Canadian Crop Hail Association.

The storms occurred May 26, June 4, June 9, June 13-17.

CCHA member companies are investigating about 200 claims of crop damage during the time period.

Darryl Tiefenbach, of Additional Municipal Hail, says a storm damaged peas in Cadillac community of Saskatchewan.

“The damage was generally minimal since it is an early storm and the crop is in its early stage of growth,” he said.

Tyson Ryhorchuk of Rain and Hail Insurance Service reported damage to crops in the Alberta communities of Taber, Coaldale, Vauxhall and damage in Albertville in Saskatchewan.

“The wind was a large factor within the Albertville storm as well,” he said.

Brendan Blight of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation reported damage to fall rye, wheat, canola, soybeans, sunflowers in the Manitoba communities of Altona, Elkhorn and Miniota.

“Fall rye in Altona had some severe damage,” he said. “All other crops had minor damage.”

He said high winds are a factor in adjusting the claims.

Murray Bantle of Cooperative Hail Insurance Company reported light to medium damage to beans, wheat and canola across Manitoba. He also reported light to heavy damage to wheat, canola and peas in Saskatchewan.

Scott McQueen of Palliser Insurance Company reported minor damage to peas and canola in Alberta.

CCHA member companies are reminding customers to review and understand the new COVID-19 protocols designed to keep adjusters and policy holders as safe as possible.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the farmers across Canada. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc, Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd., New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission and Palliser Insurance Company Ltd.

Farmers Prepare for 2020 Hail Season

Canadian Crop Hail Association member companies are ready to safely help farmers lock in their hail insurance coverage for the 2020 season by following COVID-19 guidelines.

Member companies will follow all government directives and adhere to government social distancing requirements. They will allow only the owner/operator in a vehicle at any time, which means no passengers. They will also use disinfecting solutions to wipe down equipment and contact points, among other safety measures.

“This is an unprecedented time in Canadian agriculture, and we want our customers to know their safety, and the safety of our agents, is our top priority,” said Rick Omelchenko, president of the Canadian Crop Hail Association. “We are ready to help farmers manage the risks of Mother Nature as the storm season approaches with the same great service and expert advice we have provided for years.”

CCHA is expanding this year with the addition of a member in New Brunswick.

“We are pleased to welcome the New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission to CCHA and excited about expanding our partnership in the east,” Omelchenko said. “This growth will increase industry participation and, in turn, provide more value to our customers.”

Last year, Canadian Crop Hail Association member companies covered more than $6.5 billion in crops. Companies paid $242 million on 16,200 claims.

Overall, Saskatchewan was hit hardest last year with an industry loss ratio of 95 percent compared to 66 percent in 2018. Alberta followed with a 90 percent loss ratio compared to 42.5 percent. Manitoba had an 85 percent loss ratio compared to 81.5 percent in 2018. The industrywide loss ratio was 92 percent in 2019 compared to 63.5 percent in 2018.

“The 2019 harvest was a challenge. We had damaging storms, cool wet weather and early snow that meant not all farmers were able to complete harvest,” Omelchenko said. “Conditions vary across Canada every season. Farmers should closely consider their hail coverage levels as we enter the storm season.”

CCHA recommends that producers have hail coverage in place early in the season. Producers may not be able to purchase hail coverage after crops are damaged by a storm, which means they would carry the full risk for the remainder of the year.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association (CCHA) has been serving the crop insurance industry since 1915. It is a member-driven organization that represents the interests of the Canadian Crop Hail managing general agencies and insurance companies. These private and government organizations together provide a risk management tool to the farmers across Canada. Members are Additional Municipal Hail Ltd. (Saskatchewan), Ag Direct Hail Insurance Ltd, Agriculture Financial Services Corporation (Alberta), Canadian Hail Agencies Inc, Co-operative Hail Insurance Company, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation Rain and Hail Insurance Service Ltd., New Brunswick Agricultural Insurance Commission and Palliser Insurance Company Ltd.